Getting to Uruguay via Tigre

“Where are you off to next?” Asks the street vendor in the midst of Independence Day celebrations.
“Uruguay”.
“You know what you should do… catch a cheap train to Tigre, hope in a boat, explore the islands and arrive in Uruguay cheaper.”
So that’s what we did. And now I’m sitting on a bus in Uruguay heading towards its capital, Montevideo.

Leaving Retiro, the central train station of Buenos Aires, we arrive in the town of Tigre.

Lonely Planet calls this place the weekend getaway for the Porteños. However, I’m going to call it, the city of lost money.

Perhaps it was due to the season. Perhaps due to the fact that we only walked around the river and walked past the the closed bars and run-down houses. Hannah’s theory is the best. Perhaps due to the poor economic state of the country, those living in Tigre before can no longer afford to maintain their luxurious lifestyle and have moved away. So on that note, it may be a brilliant idea to buy a piece of land and wait for its value to rise and sell it in its peak.

Looking at these pictures, that seems like a pretty good theory:

img_1435 img_1432 img_1438img_1437

*Note. Besides at the port, there is actually no person in the photos.

Our time in Tigre consisted of buying empanadas at the bakery to eat in front of the river. We then walked down one side of the river and returned to buy some more empanadas. Seriously, these were the best I’ve eaten thus far in South America, they were full with ingredients and rich in flavour. I can’t take this lightly, since so many South American countries pride their empanadas. After getting our empanadas for the journey, we hop on the catamaran and make our way to Colonia, Uruguay.

As the sun set, we passed numerous bushy islands, forming part of the Paraná Delta. This route was definitely the more interesting one. During my journey through South America in 2011, we took buquebus directly from Buenos Aires to Colonia, spending more money and missing the eerie sites of the Paraná Delta.

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